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About this collection

The Jack Large Photograph Collection documents the adventures and counterculture lifestyle of photographer Jack Large and his artist friends through the late sixties in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. This collection of about 1,200 photographic slides, taken primarily between February 1966 and July 1969, was donated to The Seattle Public Library following a Kickstarter campaign titled Pike Market Memories 1966-1968.

 

Large moved to Seattle in February 1966, and not long after began working for Tall's Camera where he would find a box of unused Ektachrome 127 film. As an employee he also received discounted Kodak processing mailers and free processing at Technicolor. That combined with his Baby Rolleiflex Twin Lens Camera, which he received as a high school graduation present from his father Jackson, allowed Large to amass "a collection of several thousand images in a short time."

 

By September 1966, Large "had a sleeping room in Abie Label's 'artist colony' on the 11th floor of the Frye Hotel near Seattle's Pioneer Square", and by December 1966, was living with poet Charles Potts in Belltown. Large spent most of 1967 living in a studio apartment behind the Zig Zag Gallery at Pike Place Market, and most of 1968 living in Madrona. The collection includes images from his residences along with people, places, and events such as: the Pike Place Market, Downtown Seattle, Shopping Malls (Northgate, South Center, and University Village in Seattle; and Crossroads and Sunset Village in Bellevue), the Volunteer Park Be-In, the Great Piano Drop, the Love Arts Festival, sailing on Puget Sound, camping at Olympic National Park, poets (Charles Potts and Edward Smith), artists (Rich Beyer, Leon Sarsozo, Boddie McClure, David Wagner, and others), and art galleries (Jack Cabe's Zig Zag Gallery, Jakk Corsaw's Jakk's Gallery, Dick Anderson's Anderson Gallery).

 

According to Large, "the collection is, in fact, a single historical artifact. It is a slide show that was presented many dozens of times over the years in a specific way intended as a presentation of art, or alternately as a component of a touring psychedelic light show. Its effectiveness depended on the mechanical characteristics of two Kodak Carousel slide projectors set on the fastest automatic cycling speed and running through four 120-slot slide trays simultaneously, with a carefully selected, and in some cases edited, music and audio track." In April 1969, about 500 of these slides were presented to the Seattle City Council in support of the Friends of the Market. According to the April 5, 1969 Seattle Times, "A rapid-fire slide presentation accompanied by a musical sound track set a new tone at yesterday's City Council hearing on the Pike Place Market urban-renewal project. Jack Large, 421 Prospect St., offered council members a pictorial presentation of photographic evidence of those values of the public market which can't be presented in any other way." The lights were dimmed and two projectors began showing a rapid sequence of slides. A soundtrack boomed exotic Indian melodies."

 
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